Investing in Futures Economic and Fiscal Benefits of Postsecondary Education in Prison

Secondary Education for prisoners to reduce recidivism 

“But the study says that research shows that giving inmates access to post-secondary education is critical to reducing mass incarceration, lowering recidivism rates and ensuring public safety.”

www.georgetownpoverty.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/GCPI-ESOI-Investing-in-Futures-Report-FINAL-20190116.pdf

Police shootings report by – Tampa Bay Times and Radiolab

Below there are two reports on police shootings.

Radiolab

Part-one of 2 podcasts

https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/shots-fired-part-1

Interesting comment at About 31:00 COP Daytona Beach Mike Chitwood arrests are 60:40 almost exact as the population

 

Shots fired part 2

https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/shots-fired-part-2

FL Newspaper Tracks Police Shootings: 827 In Six Years

No one was keeping track of police shootings in Florida, the third-largest state. So in 2014, the Tampa Bay Times set out to count every officer-involved shooting in Florida during a six-year period. At least 827 people were shot by police, one every 2 1/2 days. More than half, 434, were fatal. Blacks were shot at a higher rate than whites. On-duty police are almost never charged with crimes for firing, even though agencies pay millions to settle civil lawsuits, the Times reports.

http://www.tampabay.com/projects/2017/investigations/florida-police-shootings/

 

For an alternative view you MUST see

https://futureofpolicing.blog/2019/01/10/qpp-extra-radiolab-got-it-wrong-quality-policing-podcast/

 

QPP Extra – Radiolab Got It Wrong – Quality Policing Podcast

This podcast takes a look at data and police use of force.

The author has one of the BEST commentaries on data and analysis of police use of force and bias and where the mews media fails interpreting police contact data.

THIS IS A MUST LISTEN for anyone discussing police use of force.

QPP Extra – Radiolab Got It Wrong – Quality Policing Podcast
— Read on qualitypolicing.com/qpp-extra-radiolab-got-it-wrong/

 

 

For an alternative view see:

https://futureofpolicing.blog/2019/01/10/police-shootings-report-by-tampa-bay-times-and-radiolab/

 

Charges To Be Declined | Rachael Rollins for Suffolk DA

Don’t District Attorneys swear an oath to uphold the laws of their state? Why are the rights of a criminal put before the rights of a victim?

So if you shoplift (steal from a store) get arrested the DA won’t prosecute?

This will make 2019 Christmas Shopping less painful.

Charges for which the Default is to Decline Prosecuting (unless supervisor permission is obtained).

— Read on rollins4da.com/policy/charges-to-be-declined/

QPP 21: Interview with Retired CPD Lt Edward Richards – Quality Policing Podcast

This is one of the BEST podcasts on police that I have ever heard.

It captures the essence of policing. Lt. Richards and Dr. Moskos discuss the application of policing on the streets. They talk about an incident that occurred in Chicago on Memorial Day 2018 and use it to frame the discussion of policing, police stops, politics, standards of proof, de-policing, police discretion, arrests and more.

This is a great discussion of what policing is about and why policing shouldn’t be overly restricted by political interests.

It’s a must listen to students of criminal justice.

While it is nothing new for police officers it will reaffirm how policing should be!!!

QPP 21: Interview with Retired CPD Lt Edward Richards – Quality Policing Podcast
— Read on qualitypolicing.com/qpp-interview-with-retired-cpd-lt-edward-richards/

Opinion | When the Police Become Prosecutors – The New York Times

READ this article carefully. The premise of the article is that misdemeanor level offenses are being made criminal. Common misdemeanor offenses like larceny, damage of property, drug possession, weapons possession, and assault. These are crimes all day long. I think the author is wanting to decriminalize these offenses. Really?

Officers quietly wield a lot of unchecked prosecutorial power.
— Read on www.nytimes.com/2018/12/26/opinion/police-prosecutors-misdemeanors.html