Crime victim vs. public nuisance | Modern Policing

This article points out an apparent flaw in many public nuisance laws — they can penalize crime victims. In the case of domestic violence, some victims who have called the police multiple times have crossed a threshold that put their home into the public nuisance category, particularly risky when renting from a landlord. Others have…
— Read on gcordner.wordpress.com/2018/10/13/crime-victim-vs-public-nuisance/

Run-down, abandoned buildings pose problems for law enforcement – News – The Topeka Capital-Journal – Topeka, KS

A 2016 study of blight on 32 Topeka city blocks found an increase in number of police calls, code violations and dollars spent when there were abandoned buildings in an area.The study, conducted by Wichita State University, found that about $31,100 in additional personnel resources were needed to complete code violation cases in city blocks with abandoned housing present rather than those without.The effects of abandoned housing in those areas were significant: police response frequency to city
— Read on www.cjonline.com/news/20181014/run-down-abandoned-buildings-pose-problems-for-law-enforcement

The Wichita State 2016 REPORT

Youth * Guns * Chicago

Here are 3 publications about Youth Guns in Chicago

  • The first is a news article at “The Trace”
  • The second link is to an article about social networking and firearms access in the Journal of Urban Health
  • The final publication is a Gun Trace report by CPD

 

How and Why Chicago’s At-Risk Youth Carry Guns

Young people in the city’s violent neighborhoods arm themselves for protection, new research shows, knowing that few shooters are caught by the police.

Access the article HERE

 

Chicago Criminals Are ‘Handshakes’ Away From Illegal Guns, Study Finds

Chicago has heralded much-welcome reductions in gun violence this year, but the city is still regularly convulsed by shootings, with some 50 people injured or killed by gunfire in the first week of May alone. Just how easy it is for Chicago’s shooters to obtain their weapons came into sharper relief this month, thanks to innovative new research.

Closer to Guns: the Role of Street Gangs in Facilitating Access to Illegal Firearms.

Abstract

Criminal offenders often turn to social networks to gain access to firearms, yet we know little about how networks facilitate access to firearms. This study conducts a network analysis of a co-offending network for the City of Chicago to determine how close any offender may be to a firearm. We use arrest data to recreate the co-offending network of all individuals who were arrested with at least one other person over an eight-year period. We then use data on guns recovered by the police to measure potential network pathways of any individual to known firearms. We test the hypothesis that gangs facilitate access to firearms and the extent to which such access relates to gunshot injury among gang members. Findings reveal that gang membership reduces the potential network distance (how close someone is) to known firearms by 20% or more, and regression results indicate that the closer gang members are to guns, the greater their risk of gunshot victimization.

Link to JOURNAL

Gun Trace Report 2017 Chicago PD

Report HERE

Promising Strategies for Strengthening Homicide Investigations

Here is a new publication for strengthening Homicide Investigations.  BJA always produces excellent resources.

Findings and Recommendations from the Bureau of Justice Assistance’s Homicide Investigations Enhancement Training and Technical Assistance Project (NCJ 252173), BJA-Sponsored, October 2018. With support from BJA, the Police Executive Research Forum conducted a multi-year project to assess homicide investigation practices in five cities: Baltimore, Cleveland, Houston, Miami, and Pittsburgh. This report summarizes the lessons learned from those five studies.

Promising Strategies for Strengthening Homicide Investigations

News Article on the Hartford Civilian Police Review Board

For 12 years, dozens of people who filed complaints with a watchdog panel to report mistreatment by city police never had their cases investigated or even opened by the group, Hartford’s Civilian Police Review Board.

City lawyers, concerned that complaints of police misconduct substantiated by a third party could be used against Hartford in lawsuits, withheld from the board all cases in which the complainant was suing or considering suing the city from 2005 to 2017.

Read the news story here.