NIJ’s 50th Anniversary — Looking Back, Looking Forward

This is an EXCELLENT review of the benefit of the NIJ for the last 50 years

“NIJ’s 50th anniversary is an opportunity to reflect on how far the Institute has come, as well as its direction and priorities moving forward. In this Research for the Real World event, panelists will speak to the history and future of the Institute, drawing from decades of experience working for and closely with NIJ. Two Former NIJ Directors will reflect on their days heading the agency and their observations on how the agency has changed over time. Two police chiefs will talk about the importance of research to guide policing and the impact NIJ-funded research has had on their work.”

Link to the VIDEO

Favorite Police & Criminal Justice Websites

What are some of your favorite police or Criminal Justice websites?

National Criminal Justice Reference Service | NCJRS

NCJRS, an Office of Justice Programs resource, offers juvenile and criminal justice information to support research, policy, and program development worldwide.
— Read on www.ncjrs.gov/

NCJRS is one of my favorites.

The Crime Report

This is one of the best resources of criminal justice information across the US.  There is a subscription fee to have full access to the material.  There is also a student discount.

As part of it’s mission:

The Crime Report (TCR) is the nation’s only comprehensive news service covering the diverse challenges and issues of 21st century criminal justice in the U.S. and abroad.” 

 

 

Despite spike in shootings, a Chicago community gets a handle on violence – CSMonitor.com

2016 was Chicago’s most violent year in nearly two decades, with more murders than New York and Los Angeles combined. But the city has made impressive strides toward becoming a safer place – and Englewood is leading the way.
— Read on www.csmonitor.com/USA/Society/2018/0808/Despite-spike-in-shootings-a-Chicago-community-gets-a-handle-on-violence

This is an nice article about how Englewood has reduced crime and made it safer for the community. Part of the solution is the partnership between the police and the Englewood community.

I would like to see an analysis of Chicago’s crime problem to see what the causes are. That way a menu of crime-fighting strategies can be developed and implemented further attacking the violent crime problem.

That fact that Englewood has made improvements to its crime problem is promising.

Boston PD – Body Worn Cameras

Below are links to 2 articles that report Boston PD’s progress on it’s department wide implementation of body worn cameras.   The last link is to the report on the implantation of BWCs

“In January 2015, the Boston Police Department (BPD) committed to implement a pilot body worn camera (BWC) program for its officers. This pilot was intended to help answer policy questions about how the system would operate if and when fully implemented and to address concerns of officers and community members on the use of the technology. Boston Mayor Martin Walsh and Boston Police Commissioner William Evans committed to a rigorous evaluation of this pilot program.”

– This is an excerpt from the Final Report for the evaluation of the implementation of BWCs.

NPR WBUR radio report on Boston PD Body Worn Cameras

Phys.org article on Boston PD Body Worn Cameras

Here is the link to the study:

THE IMPACTS OF BODY WORN CAMERAS ON POLICE-CITIZEN ENCOUNTERS, POLICE PROACTIVITY, AND POLICE – COMMUNITY RELATIONS IN BOSTON

Precision Policing

William Bratton one of the Greatest Leaders in Policing talks about his latest concept of policing – Precision Policing.  Here is an excerpt from his recent article:

“Fortunately, a Peel-inspired template exists for how policing can effectively confront the Great Divide, prevent crime and disorder, and address other pressing problems such as the opioid epidemic, homelessness, and quality-of-life concerns—a strategy built on lessons from earlier crucibles, best practices from around the country, and effective collaboration among political leaders, the police, and the public. Coauthor Bratton and his executive team, of which coauthor Murad was a member, named it “precision policing.””

Links to Bratton’s article and interview from the City Journal:

William Bratton – Precision Policing in the City-Journal

Interview: Bratton on “Precision Policing”