Hearing on Protests Across U.S. and Lafayette Square Incident

Acting U.S. Park Police Chief Gregory Monahan testified on the agency’s role in clearing protesters in Lafayette Square in June 2020 so that President Trump could pose for a photograph at St. John’s Church nearby. Chief Monahan said protesters were cleared from the area to erect fencing meant to stop violence that had occurred in the area the days leading up to the incident. He denied the order to clear the park was connected to the presidential picture at the church and said Park Police and members of the Secret Service used “tremendous restraint.” Major Adam DeMarco of the District of Columbia National Guard, who was acting as a liaison between Park Police and the National Guard that day, also testified under the Military Whistleblower Protection Act. Major DeMarco stated he saw unidentified law enforcement use pepper balls to disperse protesters that day. He said in his opening statement the events were “deeply disturbing” and that demonstrators were “behaving peacefully.” See the video HERE

Attorney General Barr Testifies on Justice Department Mission and Programs

AG Barr was awesome in his testimony. The Democratic Representatives’ statements and questions were terrible, filled with lies, it was misleading, fabrications. How are they fulfilling their oath of office and representing the American People.

Attorney General William Barr testified on the Justice Department’s mission and programs in an oversight hearing before the House Judiciary Committee. Lawmakers questioned the attorney general on a range issues of including involvement in the Roger Stone and Michael Flynn cases, police reform, and federal law enforcement actions toward protesters. SEE IT HERE

Federal Probation and Supervised Release Violations

Federal Probation and Supervised Release Violations presents data on approximately 108,000 violation hearings that occurred between 2013 and 2017. The report examines the prevalence, types, and locations of federal supervision violations as well as the characteristics of more than 82,000 violators. The report also compares supervision violators to the population of federal offenders originally sentenced to probation or a sentence including a term of supervised release during the same time period. (Published July 28, 2020)

Which States Have Acted on Police Reform | Statista

Colorado, Iowa, New York and now Connecticut are the only states that have successfully passed legislation aimed at attacking systemic police racism through improved police oversight and accountability

• Chart: Which States Have Acted on Police Reform | Statista
— Read on https:www.statista.com/chart/amp/22172/legislation-on-police-reform-by-state/

Policy Reforms Can Strengthen Community Supervision

Excellent Resource!!

A framework to improve probation and parole

Overview

Since 1980, the nation’s community supervision population has ballooned by almost 240 percent. As of 2016, 1 in 55 U.S. adults (nearly 4.5 million people) are on probation or parole, more than twice the number incarcerated in state and federal prisons and local jails. Historically, probation and parole were intended to provide a less punitive, more constructive alternative to incarceration, but a growing body of evidence suggests that a frequent emphasis on surveillance and monitoring of people under supervision rather than on promoting their success, along with the resource demands of ever-larger caseloads, has transformed community supervision into a primary driver of incarceration. This shift has produced an array of troubling consequences, not only for individuals on probation and parole but for taxpayers and communities as well.

See report HERE