Cited for Being in Plain Sight: How California Polices Being Black, Brown, and Unhoused in Public

In the wake of the police killings of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, as hundreds of thousands of protestors have joined demonstrations throughout the world, there is renewed attention on the day to day dysfunction of police. And, there is new energy and increased political will to eliminate harmful police functions. From inherently segregationist “Ugly Laws” to the Reconstruction era “Black Codes,” the development and enforcement of infraction laws has been and continues to be racist and classist. Police in California issued over 250,000 non-traffic infraction citations in 2019. Non-traffic infractions are only the most low-level violations in both the state and local municipal codes, punishable by a fine. They do not include harms to people or property, but instead criminalize everyday behaviors such as standing, sleeping, owning a dog, and crossing the street.1 Data from this report show deep racial disparities in enforcement: these are not citations police commonly give in white, wealthy neighborhoods. Though the citations are criminal, there is no right to an attorney, and therefore little recourse for people who are targeted for enforcement because of their race. The result is hundreds of dollars in fines and fees people cannot afford to pay, and, in some counties, warrants and arrests for people who do not either pay or appear in court. This ongoing form of police harassment of Black and Latinx communities, people experiencing homelessness, and people with disabilities can cause trauma, and enforcement of minor infractions has led to police violence.

Traffic Stops in Baltimore County Maryland

There are 3 types of police stops for vehicle and traffic infractions: Moving, non-moving, and administrative. When you look at the data keep in mind what type of stops are most used? Also think how police might be issuing the traffic tickets. Are the tickets the reason for the stop? Is the ticket an infraction detected after initial stop like the car was stopped for speeding and then it was discovered that the driver’s license was suspended. Or was a crime discovered that was totally unrelated from the stop like the driver was speeding and a gun was observed in the vehicle.

It would be interesting to know the initial reason for the stop for each stop and then see how the stops progress.

Dashboard

The dashboard has analysis of police traffic stops in Baltimore County Maryland

The Dashboard can be accessed HERE

Report from Baltimore County Maryland Equitable Policing Advisory Group: Initial Findings and Recommendations

PROTEST LAWS

Eight States Enact Anti-Protest Laws

Eight states have passed laws cracking down on protest activity since Black Lives Matter protests erupted across the United States last summer, according to the International Center for Not-For-Profit Law, which tracks such legislation. Similar bills are pending in 21 states, according to the Washington, D.C.-based center.

New laws enacted in Arkansas, Florida, Iowa, Oklahoma and Tennessee this year increase penalties for blocking traffic, tearing down monuments and other unlawful behavior during a protest or riot. The bills typically define “riot” as a gathering of three or more people that threatens public safety.

See more HERE

Republicans Respond to Black Lives Matter with Anti-Protest Bills

This story has been updated to clarify changes to penalties for drivers under state legislation.

Genee Tinsley helped organize rallies and marches in Palm Beach County, Florida, last summer to protest police brutality, demand racial justice and call for redirecting some police funding to social services.

Now she’s organizing an online forum to teach people about a Florida bill that would increase penalties for unlawful activity during a protest. The bill could give law enforcement broad discretion to declare a gathering a “riot” and charge participants with a felony crime.

See more HERE

Interactive Map – US Protest Law Tracker

Scroll down for information on Legislation and executive orders

The MAP and LAW and be found HERE

The Glenn Show: Glenn Loury and Mark Kleiman

3/10-3/12/2012

Glenn Loury (Watson Institute for International and Public AffairsBrown University) and Mark Kleiman (The Reality-Based CommunityNYUWhen Brute Force Fails)

Mark and Glenn start off by recalling Harvard’s Kennedy School in 1980s, where they both came to know James Q. Wilson. Mark says liberals got the crime question wrong, while Glenn urges that “crime” be placed in broad political perspective. Glenn asks why the US imprisons so many—could the answer be American democracy? Glenn and Mark argue the merits of the new parole supervision policy reflected in Project HOPE. They close with a heated debate on crime, human nature, and Wilson’s legacy

You can get the show HERE

My favorite theory from Dr. Kleiman as a police strategy is Enforcement Swamping. In a nut shell Swamping occurs, lets say in a parking lot when police give extra enforcement at the entrances so persons using the parking lots might believe that this “extra enforcement” is throughout the parking area and the “bad people” believe that it is risky to use the parking lot and either go somewhere else or stop there bad activities.

Crime, Justice, and Reform (Glenn Loury & Peter Moskos) on The Glenn Show

12-23-2019

Glenn Loury (Watson Institute for International and Public AffairsBrown University) and Peter Moskos (John Jay Collegecopinthehood.com)

·         Peter explains how stop-and-frisk went too far  2:36
·         Who or what deserves credit for NYC’s massive murder decline?  10:48
·         Peter: Reducing poverty is not the way to reduce crime  18:31
·         Are cops reaping the whirlwind?  20:48
·         The aftermath of Freddie Gray in Baltimore and Laquan McDonald in Chicago  29:38
·         Criminal justice reform and the potential backlash  37:09

This is another terrific podcast by Glenn Loury. Peter Moskos is a very interesting guest. Dr. Moskos has an interesting insight into police work. You should also check out the stuff that Moskos posts on his websites.

Featured

Some thoughts on the first 787 posts! Thank you!

Hello:

This is the 787th Blog post for “FutureofPolicing.blog” 

That is a lot of material and I would like to invite you to spend some time and explore to see what is available here.  You can easily search (in the search field) your interests in Criminal Justice (especially Policing) and see if there are any earlier posts that you may find interesting.

This blog was made for 2 major purposes: 

First is to promote discussion of Criminal Justice ideas.  Currently I comment very little compared to what I see on most blogs.  In the future I hope to comment more but writing takes time and so does finding and posting interesting material.  I have a few “article type” papers I need to complete that I hope to post and I would be interested in feedback and discussion.  These articles are months away from completion and I not sure how I want to present them.  

The second purpose is to post material that is used by police departments, County Government, use in policy making, and by decision makers and is not commonly seen in college classrooms.   This is the type of resources that impact day to day operations and are not discussed in academia.  Of course I also seek out government studies and academic material (when freely available) to post.  I think that this type of material is not know beyond its local municipality.  A common belief is Policing is local, however, this doesn’t mean that a municipality and the issues it’s police department faces is 100% unique from all the police departments across the nation.  This is why I believe it is useful to study how other police departments operate and respond to adversity, face issues, etc.

To those that FOLLOW this blog – THANK YOU!  I really appreciate it when you take a look at the new post. 

To those that “LIKE” posts thanks for letting me know I’m doing something worthwhile.

FEEL FREE to SHARE.  Please let your friends or fellow students know about this blog if they have an interest in POLICING or Criminal Justice.

Lastly – COMMENTS:  Comments are COOL!  I enjoy responding to comments.  I blog as a hobby so there may be a delay for me to respond but I will.