Less Is More: How Reducing Probation Populations Can Improve Outcomes

In this NEW REPORT, co-authored by Michael Jacobson, Vincent Schiraldi, Reagan Daly, and Emily Hotez, the authors discuss the consequences of the tremendous growth in probation supervision over the past several decades in the United States and argue that the number of people on probation supervision needs to be significantly downsized.

The authors find that probation has often not served as an alternative to incarceration, but rather as a key driver of mass incarceration in the United States. Despite the large numbers of individuals under supervision, probation is the most underfunded of agencies within the criminal justice system. This leaves those under supervision, often an impoverished population, with the responsibility of paying for probation supervision fees, court costs, urinalysis tests, and electronic monitoring fees among a plethora of other fines. These financial obligations have incredibly detrimental implications on the mental and economic state of those under supervision and is argued to be an unjust and ineffective public policy.

‘Largest commutation’ in U.S. history expected in Oklahoma Nov. 1

This would be an opportunity to test theories and strategies on Risk Assessments and Recidivism. The mandated release would allow tracking those released to see how the released prisoners would compare to previous prisoners whose release was denied or who were given parole or were released for treatment.

Thanks to new state law, Oklahoma Pardon and Parole Board officials expect more than 400 inmates to pass through the expedited commutation process Nov. 1.
— Read on www.readfrontier.org/stories/largest-single-day-commutation-in-nations-history-expected-to-take-place-in-oklahoma-next-month/