An excellent discussion on Policing QPP 56: Peter Moskos and Alex Vitale, moderated by Michael Fortner – Peter Moskos

Excellent discussion on Policing

This is truly a must listen for all criminal justice students interested in policing. 

QPP 56: Peter Moskos and Alex Vitale, moderated by Michael Fortner – Peter Moskos
— Read on qualitypolicing.com/qpp-alex-vitale-and-michael-fortner/

Police Race Action Plan | College of Policing

How we’re working to make policing anti-racist and reform or explain race disparities.
The Police Race Action Plan sets out changes across policing to improve outcomes for Black people who work within or interact with policing.

The plan was developed jointly by the College of Policing and the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC), working in collaboration with Black communities and partners – including the National Black Policing Association (NBPA)(opens an external website in the same tab) and an independent scrutiny and oversight board (ISOB). It has the commitment of all 43 chief constables in England and Wales.

It aims to address:

disparities affecting Black people
lower levels of trust and confidence in the police among some Black people
— Read on www.college.police.uk/support-forces/diversity-and-inclusion/action-plan

Breaking Down the 2020 Homicide Spike | Manhattan Institute

In 2020, amid the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic and the protests and riots surrounding the death of George Floyd, America’s homicide rate increased by an astonishing 30%, even as many less serious types of crime held steady or even declined.[1]The purpose of this brief is to describe the…
— Read on www.manhattan-institute.org/breaking-down-the-2020-homicide-spike

REIMAGINING PUBLIC SAFETY IN THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS A VISION FOR CHANGE

The investigation uncovered the following key problems in the current state of public safety in St. Louis:

• Racial disparities in the harms inflicted by policing;

• Gaps and inconsistencies in SLMPD policies (especially related to use of force, pedestrian and vehicle stops, and interactions with people experiencing mental health emergencies);

• A need for non-police alternative responders for certain call types;

• Inefficiencies in the allocation of SLMPD patrol staff and resources, which create inequities in service levels;

• A need for accessible, affordable out-of-school time programming for St. Louis youth;

• Insufficient community engagement on the part of the City and SLMPD; and.

• A lack of robust accountability systems for SLMPD.

policingequity.org/images/pdfs-doc/Reimagining_Public_Safety_in_St._Louis_Final_Report.pdf

Investigation into the City of Minneapolis and the Minneapolis Police Department

This is an investigation into discrimination by the Minneapolis Human Rights Department.

Findings of Discrimination

The Minnesota Department of Human Rights finds there is probable cause that the City and MPD engage in a pattern or practice of race discrimination in violation of the Minnesota Human Rights Act.

Specifically, the Minnesota Department of Human Rights finds that MPD engages in a pattern or practice of discriminatory, race-based policing as evidenced by:

• Racial disparities in how MPD officers use force, stop, search, arrest, and cite people of color, particularly Black individuals, compared to white individuals in similar circumstances.

• MPD officers’ use of covert social media to surveil Black individuals and Black organizations, unrelated to criminal activity.

• MPD officers’ consistent use of racist, misogynistic, and disrespectful language. The pattern or practice of discriminatory, race-based policing is caused primarily by an

organizational culture where:

• MPD officers, supervisors, and field training officers receive deficient training, which emphasizes a paramilitary approach to policing that results in officers unnecessarily escalating encounters or using inappropriate levels of force.

• Accountability systems are insufficient and ineffective at holding officers accountable for misconduct.

• Former and current City and MPD leaders have not collectively acted with the urgency, coordination, and intentionality necessary to address racial disparities in policing to improve public safety and increase community trust.

Without fundamental organizational culture changes, reforming MPD’s policies, procedures, and trainings will be meaningless.

mn.gov/mdhr/assets/Investigation into the City of Minneapolis and the Minneapolis Police Department_tcm1061-526417.pdf

Minnesota’s Attorney General Says the Cop Who Killed Amir Locke Was Defending Himself. So Was Locke.

There is a link in the article to the official Attorney General’s report.

That perplexing situation underlines the hazards of police tactics that aim to prevent violence but often have the opposite effect.
— Read on reason.com/2022/04/07/minnesotas-attorney-general-says-the-cop-who-killed-amir-locke-was-defending-himself-so-was-locke/

What really happened that night in Louisville and the shooting of Breonna Taylor?

If you only listen to news media reports you get one version of how Breonna Taylor died that night 3-13-2020. Listen to Sgt. John Mattingly on Charlie Kirk’s podcast and the listener is exposed to a vastly different version to what happened that day. One thing for certain is that evening has impacted the Taylor family and the officers at the incident beyond comprehension. What is owed to both is the truth.

The segment on the Charlie Kirk podcast interview of Sgt. John Mattingly begins at about the 15:30 minute mark can be accessed HERE and lasts for about 11 1/2 minutes until the 27:00 minute mark. Sgt. Mattingly sounds professional and believable. Why didn’t this information come out immediately after the incident? Kirk mentions that this incident has impacted police policy across the nation. Especially ending the police use of “No Knock Warrants” which weren’t even in play here. Police decisions based on lies lead to bad policing.

Official police records can be seen HERE.