Ohio Lawmaker Wants Law Requiring Police to Record Race During Traffic Stops

An Ohio lawmaker says she will introduce legislation requiring police agencies to record race data when making traffic stops, following a Marshall Project – Cleveland investigation into how the village of Bratenahl tickets mostly Black drivers from neighboring Cleveland.

State Rep. Juanita Brent, a Democrat from Cleveland, said the information is needed to determine whether police agencies unfairly stop more Black and Brown drivers compared to White drivers.

This article was published in partnership with News 5 Cleveland.

The Marshall Project – Cleveland’s investigation noted that 60% or more of drivers cited for traffic violations by Bratenahl police since 2020 were Black.

See More HERE

Police Accountability Task Force | Chicago 2016

As part of our work, the Task Force heard from many current and former CPD officers who are dedicated public servants, committed to performing their duties lawfully and making Chicago a safer place for all of its residents. Serving as a police officer is a challenging and often dangerous job. The police face an increasingly daunting challenge in crime fighting. Illegal guns flood the streets of the same neighborhoods that are devastated by crime, poverty and unemployment. We as a society cannot expect the police to cure every ill in Chicago’s neighborhoods. Yet we put significant pressure on them to solve and prevent crime, as well as to address the manifestations of a number of other daunting social and economic challenges beyond their charge and capacity to manage, let alone solve. Still, a keen appreciation of and sensitivity to these broader issues is critical to effective law enforcement and positive community-police relations.

The findings and recommendations in this report are not meant to disregard or undervalue the efforts of the many dedicated CPD officers who show up to work every day to serve and protect the community. The challenge is creating a partnership between the police and the community that is premised upon respect and recognizes that our collective fates are very much intertwined. Simply put, a more professional, engaged and respectful police force benefits us all. We cannot and have not shied away

from identifying systemic problems or challenges that undermine the efforts of those officers who are sincerely committed to doing their jobs the right way. To be sure, individual officers must own responsibility for not merely their actions each day, but also the reverberating and sometimes corrosive and lingering effect of those actions on citizens. And ultimately, the responsibility for setting the correct course lies with CPD leadership itself.

igchicago.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/PATF_Final_Report_4_13_16-1.pdf

Podcast then Glenn Show: A discussion between Glenn Loury and Rafael Mangual about Manhual’s Book: “Criminal (In)Justice: What the Push for Decarceration and Depolicing Gets long and Who It Hurts Most”

If you haven’t read Rafael Mangual’s book it’s AWESOME!!  It’s an easy read pertinent to what is going on in policing and criminal justice. If you have never listen to the Glenn show before it is an awesome podcast.

This episode of the gun show highlights much of what is discussed in the book with Glenn Loury, playing devil’s advocate, and Rafael Manuel answering all his questions. I recommend listening to this podcast and then going out and getting the book. 

Glenn Loury (Manhattan Institute, Brown University) and Rafael Mangual (Manhattan Institute, Criminal (In)Justice: What the Push for Decarceration and Depolicing Gets long and Who It Hurts Most)
— Read on bloggingheads.tv/videos/65115

A Study of Bias in the Washington D.C. Metropolitan Police Department’s Threat Assessment Process – National Policing Institute

A Study of Bias in the Washington D.C. Metropolitan Police Department’s Threat Assessment Process – National Policing Institute

There is a link for a .pdf to the report at the webpage.
— Read on www.policinginstitute.org/publication/a-study-of-bias-in-the-washington-d-c-metropolitan-police-departments-threat-assessment-process/

Public Report — Chicago Use of Force Community Working Group

Public Report on the Use of Force Community Working Group—Chicago

The Use of Force Community Working Group1 has achieved transformative changes to the Chicago Police Department’s (CPD) Use of Force policies. These changes are the result of the Community Working Group’s leadership and advocacy and have the potential to reduce CPD violence and make the people of Chicago safer. This Report, issued by the community members who served on the Working Group, highlights those changes and describes the greatest shortcomings in CPD’s force policies still in need of change. It is critical that Chicagoans are informed both about our progress and about the areas where it remains crucial for people to speak out and advocate for change. We recommend that the Community Commission on Public Safety and Accountability immediately take up these recommendations for a better and safer Chicago. One of the greatest lessons we learned in this process is that change is not self-executing: it happens only when the people of Chicago make it happen.

See the report here:

www.law.uchicago.edu/files/2022-09/2022.09.22_UOF_WG_Report_upload.pdf

Discrimination and Disparities: Is Policing a Bigger Problem Than Crime? | OLD PARKLAND CONFERENCE – YouTube

Excellent discussion give it a listen!!

Are racial disparities in arrests and incarceration evidence of racist policing? Is over-policing a primary threat to the safety of black communities, as Black Lives Matter activists and others have argued in recent years? Should we reduce police resources and prosecute fewer crimes? Do black men have more reason than others to fear law enforcement? Is the drug war driving “mass incarceration”? Jason Riley engaged with Janice Rogers Brown, Roland Fryer, and Rafael Mangual on these questions and more
— Read on m.youtube.com/watch