Who Gets Caught Doing Crime? | Bureau of Justice Statistics

This is an interesting article that discusses that amount of crime a criminal commits before getting caught. This is an important consideration when discussing recidivism, open cases, and reoffending.

Rand survey respondents were considered to be “high-rate” if they reported committing any one of seven types of crime at rates higher than 70 percent of respondents who also committed that crime. The offenders who are arrested frequently despite their relatively low rate of committing crimes are called “low-rate losers” in this study. The study shows that some arrestees with apparently extensive arrest histories are not high-rate, serious offenders. Rather, they are somewhat inept, unprofessional criminals who may be arrested nearly every time they commit a crime. Based on their arrest record alone, it is practically impossible to distinguish them from offenders who commit crimes at high rates. Based on this finding, the authors caution against trying to use as indicators of high-rate criminal behavior the total number of times individuals have been arrested or convicted as adults.

Who Gets Caught Doing Crime? | Bureau of Justice Statistics
— Read on bjs.ojp.gov/library/publications/who-gets-caught-doing-crime-0

Applying Procedural Justice in Community Supervision

Abstract

Procedural justice, a framework for authority figures to treat people with fairness and respect, can improve probation supervision and core supervision outcomes. This report summarizes the approach and provision outcomes of an effort to develop and pilot a new procedural justice training curriculum outlining new tools and practices for probation officers. Analyses of interactions between supervising officers and people under supervision, survey responses regarding perceptions of supervision, and analyses of administrative data provided mixed findings, with some preliminary indications that participating in the procedural justice training may make probation officers’ treatment of people under supervision fairer and more respectful and improve supervision outcomes. However, the conclusions that can be drawn from even those results supportive of intervention impact are subject to significant limitations, given the nonexperimental nature of the design and the small number of observations in some of the data collected.
for more select HERE………

Select here to get a copy of the report:
Applying Procedural Justice in Community Supervision