Cited for Being in Plain Sight: How California Polices Being Black, Brown, and Unhoused in Public

In the wake of the police killings of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, as hundreds of thousands of protestors have joined demonstrations throughout the world, there is renewed attention on the day to day dysfunction of police. And, there is new energy and increased political will to eliminate harmful police functions. From inherently segregationist “Ugly Laws” to the Reconstruction era “Black Codes,” the development and enforcement of infraction laws has been and continues to be racist and classist. Police in California issued over 250,000 non-traffic infraction citations in 2019. Non-traffic infractions are only the most low-level violations in both the state and local municipal codes, punishable by a fine. They do not include harms to people or property, but instead criminalize everyday behaviors such as standing, sleeping, owning a dog, and crossing the street.1 Data from this report show deep racial disparities in enforcement: these are not citations police commonly give in white, wealthy neighborhoods. Though the citations are criminal, there is no right to an attorney, and therefore little recourse for people who are targeted for enforcement because of their race. The result is hundreds of dollars in fines and fees people cannot afford to pay, and, in some counties, warrants and arrests for people who do not either pay or appear in court. This ongoing form of police harassment of Black and Latinx communities, people experiencing homelessness, and people with disabilities can cause trauma, and enforcement of minor infractions has led to police violence.

Don’t bring back broken windows: Manhattan DA Cy Vance argues against ratcheting back up prosecutions for smaller offenses – New York Daily News

Over the past decade, New York City authored a remarkable public safety success story that saved thousands of lives, transformed the safety of communities across the five boroughs, and overturned false narratives about the efficacy of broken windows policing. As America’s safest big city, we proved that significant reductions in violent crime could be achieved without unconstitutional stop-and-frisk tactics or unnecessary prosecutions of low-level non-violent offenses, both of which disproportionately harmed our Black and Latino communities.
— Read on www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ny-oped-dont-bring-back-broken-windows-20200824-zblyi4rr7nfjlmosswwbeeb4de-story.html

Justice in the time of coronavirus: End broken windows policing – New York Daily News

We now live in a time of cancellations and closings. Most seriously, our public schools are now closed, no longer serving the 1.1 million city children who usually attend. Also shuttered are some of our principal entertainments and iconic distractions. Bars and restaurants, for instance, cannot serve sitting customers, only make deliveries.
— Read on www.nydailynews.com/opinion/ny-oped-justice-in-the-time-of-coronavirus-20200316-ovskg6k3abfwrgqjjwnhyeuygq-story.html

De Blasio’s New York Slips Toward a Crisis of Crime & Disorder – American Security Today

This is a good article on Broken Windows Policing. There are 2 videos one on Mayor De Blasio and a cartoon type video about the Broken Windows Theory. Well done!

De Blasio’s New York Slips Toward a Crisis of Crime & Disorder – American Security Today
— Read on americansecuritytoday.com/de-blasios-new-york-slips-toward-a-crisis-of-crime-disorder/

Is “Broken Windows” Broken? – KPFA

This is an interesting interview on the effects of the application of Broken Windows Policing on homeless people.

The premise of the interview was that when minor violations of law are enforced on homeless people it makes them more disorderly.

I think this premise is flawed because it is similar to saying that enforcement of speeding laws creates more speeders because by stopping someone who was speeding now makes them late to wherever they were going and now they have to speed more!!!

Is “Broken Windows” Broken? – KPFA
— Read on kpfa.org/episode/against-the-grain-july-16-2019/

Dr. Sparks article