For 55 officers involved in fatal shootings this year, it wasn’t their first time – The Washington Post

An analysis exposes another gap in the federal government’s oversight of fatal police shootings nationwide.
— Read on www.washingtonpost.com/local/public-safety/for-55-officers-involved-in-fatal-shootings-this-year-it-wasnt-their-first-time/2015/12/22/435cb680-9d04-11e5-a3c5-c77f2cc5a43c_story.html

Evidence-Based Policing in 45 Small Bytes | National Institute of Justice

This is an excellent resource for police supervision. This would be a great addition for a Police Organization and Management Class. Dr Gary Cordner is a great writer and is one of my favorite Criminal Justice authors.

Evidence-Based Policing in 45 Small Bytes | National Institute of Justice
— Read on nij.ojp.gov/library/publications/evidence-based-policing-45-small-bytes

See the report HERE

Stop-and-Frisk Data

Annual Stop-and-Frisk Numbers:

An analysis by the NYCLU revealed that innocent New Yorkers have been subjected to police stops and street interrogations more than 5 million times since 2002, and that Black and Latinx communities continue to be the overwhelming target of these tactics. At the height of stop-and-frisk in 2011 under the Bloomberg administration, over 685,000 people were stopped. Nearly 9 out of 10 stopped-and-frisked New Yorkers have been completely innocent. 

Read the 2019 REPORT

Juvenile Data – Juvenile Placement

This is an excellent resource for Juvenile Data.  There are an assortment of statistical tools available on the website.

“EZACJRP was developed to facilitate independent analysis of national data on the characteristics of youth held in residential placement facilities, including detailed information about the youth’s age, sex, race/ethnicity, placement status, length of stay, and most serious offense”.

Access the Website HERE

Leading With Race to Reimagine Youth Justice

This report explores the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Deep-End Initiative, which is helping juvenile justice jurisdictions safely and significantly reduce youth confinement — especially for young people of color.

In America today, youth of color are consistently overrepresented in courtrooms and detention centers, youth prisons and other residential institutions. This disparity is most extreme for youth in court-ordered institutions — often called the “deep end” of the system — and for youth transferred from juvenile to adult criminal courts.

See the report HERE